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Hudson Diaz
Hudson Diaz

Subtitle The Strangers [TOP]



As someone who always prefers watching films/shows with closed captioning, the subtitles for "Stranger Things" season 4 stood out to me from the get-go, as this season made some, um, distinct choices when describing the shifting tones of the show. From the now-infamous "tentacles undulating moistly" to the underrated "demogorgon feeding wetly" and "eldritch thrumming," the subtitles for season 4 are clearly something else, and there are many reasons that factored into these creative decisions.




subtitle The Strangers



Although there's an element of being silly and humorous while crafting something like "gate writhing wetly," the reason why the subtitles for season 4 are so descriptive is far more practical and necessary. Subtitles quality checker Karli Webster explained that the reason why the subtitles go into great detail describing an unpleasant sound/sensation or the nuances of the background score is that they're an instrumental tool for deaf and hard-of-hearing audiences:


"It is supposed to be an uncomfortable situation, and that's why it was used in the show... What I've noticed quite a lot online are people who don't really understand the subtitles are for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. I've seen a lot of, 'Why are the subtitles so overly descriptive? We don't need these.' And I know you don't, but you weren't the main audience for subtitles from the start."


Following its incredible fourth season, Stranger Things is at the forefront of the pop culture conversation, and one of the strangest phenomena to come from its latest outing is the depth and detail in the closed caption subtitles. The team who put together the subtitles has put so much effort into them, but Reddit users and fans elsewhere are repeatedly finding new ones that are both detailed and hilarious.


Of course, many fans will have missed these captions due to not watching subtitles, but with so much to choose from, Redditors who do use subtitles have detailed what they believe to be the best and funniest.


As many fans have noticed and as Redditors like sjp911 and various commenters pointed out, the Stranger Things subtitle team loves making audiences uneasy with multiple uses of [wet squelching] and chopped and changed variations of the two terms.


Many Redditors commented on the slew of synths in the closed captions, such as rocket_face, who says that they were "cracking up at all the different types of synth." The subtitle team really got the thesaurus' out for describing music in the show. Given how precise and deeply descriptive the terms they use are, they are helpful for those who need them and hilarious for those who enjoy seeing the wild ways they describe the songs.


The caption comes in a tense moment, but with it comes a definite sense of ridiculousness. It is hard not to laugh at the brilliant dedication of the team behind the subtitles, who are creating captions that sound like band names, all while helping those who need them immerse themselves in the action.


Many Redditors agreed with OpenFacedRuben, who say that they "also enjoyed [gate writhes wetly]," which may well be the most striking way a gate, even a gate leading to a mysterious dimension, has ever been described in subtitles. The effect is creepy but also hilarious.


The Stranger Things subtitle team built on an already great catalog of subtitles in season 4 by adding new ways to describe already well-established moments (such as, in this instance, Eleven using her powers) with fans reveling in their weirdness and picturesque nature.


Redditor Mardogplus says that their "favorite was [eldritch thrumming]," and they are not the only ones. This has become a hit on social media and one of the many examples fans cite when saying that the show made subtitles cool. Seeing closed captions utilize the beautiful range of the English language like this is a joy.


Unquestionably one of the greatest scenes in Stranger Things history comes in the finale when Eddie Munson remarkably blasts out 'Master of Puppets' in the Upside Down. The moment also gave way to what Redditor Electrical-Log-3643 believes to be the best subtitle of the series.


They say they "preferred [shreds guitar solo]" rather than [tentacles undulating mostly], and there is no denying both the brilliance and accuracy of the subtitle. What makes it all the better is the [ferocious riff] that precedes it. The team really outdid themselves and every other show out there with their unique and oftentimes funny closed captions, so much so that fans will be excited to comb through the craziness they produce while describing the events of season 5.


Languages Available in: The download links above has The Strangerssubtitles in Arabic, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Farsi Persian, French, Greek, Greenlandic, Hebrew, Indonesian, Italian, Korean, Malay, Norwegian, Romanian, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Vietnamese Languages.


Step aside, Eleven, because the real star of Stranger Things 4 was the closed captioning. Viewers who watched the season with the subtitles turned on faced a disgusting onslaught of moist, undulating tentacles and wet, squelching footsteps. The hyper-descriptive captions were so verbosely gross, they took over social media and inspired tons of memes. Although the team who actually wrote those subtitles took their jobs very seriously, they *did* admit to trolling fans a bit when it came to concocting some of the most truly revolting descriptors.


It turns out those very specific subtitles were the work of a man who asked Vulture to identify him as Jeff T. in an interview where he shed some light on the thought process that led to the creation of the viral sensations.


Stranger of Sword City (剣の街の異邦人, Tsurugi no machi no ihoujin),[8] originally titled The Stranger in Alda,[9] is a dungeon crawler role-playing video game developed by Experience, developer of Demon Gaze, for Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PlayStation Vita and Xbox One.[9] The Japanese Xbox 360 and Vita versions have different subtitles: the Xbox 360 and Windows version is subtitled White Royal Palace (白の王宮, Shiro no ōkyū), whilst the Vita version is subtitled Black Palace (黒の宮殿, Kuro no kyūden).[1][10] The Xbox 360 version was released in Japan on June 5, 2014, and the PC and PS Vita versions followed in August 2014 and January 2015.[3] The game was released internationally in 2016.[11] An updated version of the game titled Stranger of Sword City Revisited (新釈剣の街の異邦人 黒の宮殿) was released for PlayStation Vita on July 21, 2016, in Japan[12] and internationally on February 28, 2017.[13]


Stranger Things Season 4 took the most terrifying elements of the series to all-new levels, not only narratively and visually, but also with its sound effects. With many users watching the series with subtitles on, viewers took notice that the descriptions of sound effects also got much more graphic, with words like "squelching" and "writhing" being used more often than in previous seasons. The team behind the series' subtitles recently revealed that they were intentionally getting much more creative with their descriptions, using combinations of words that were not only accurate to what was happening on screen, but also evoked a visceral reaction. Stranger Things Season 4 is now streaming on Netflix.


Subtitle QA editor Karli Witkowska added, "It's a word where I can name six or seven of my friends who don't like it. It is supposed to be an uncomfortable situation, and that's why it was used in the show. What I've noticed quite a lot online are people who don't really understand the subtitles are for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. I've seen a lot of, 'Why are the subtitles so overly descriptive? We don't need these.' And I know you don't, but you weren't the main audience for subtitles from the start."


Viewers who use the subtitles to better comprehend the series' dialogue weren't the only fans to take notice, as the hard-of-hearing community also pointed out their appreciation of the detailed descriptions.


Fans who watched Season 4 of "Stranger Things" with subtitles may have noticed that many of them provide a level of detail not typically offered up. Descriptions of footsteps squelching, Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown) panting, tentacles undulating moistly, and epic music are found throughout Season 4. So how exactly did ASMR affect the subtitles of the well-loved show?


Vulture asked subtitle author Jeff T. and QA editor Karli Witkowska about their work on the closed captioning for "Stranger Things." Jeff replied that some of his phrasings were a bit of Internet trolling, but he came to many selections of words by listening to ASMR. He joked that the word "moistly" comes up quite often, explaining, "In the past year or two, I've been watching ASMR streams to figure out which words elicit that kind of response in people, so I'll grab them and put them in my word bank."


QA editor Karli Witkowska noted that many of her friends aren't a fan of the word "moist," adding, "It is supposed to be an uncomfortable situation, and that's why it was used in the show. What I've noticed quite a lot online are people who don't really understand the subtitles are for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. I've seen a lot of, 'Why are the subtitles so overly descriptive? We don't need these.' And I know you don't, but you weren't the main audience for subtitles from the start."


Although this could be due to sound mixing and levels, it could also explain the general fan response to the subtitles for Season 4 of "Stranger Things," which has led to several memes involving the excessive descriptions. Whether or not ASMR has anything to do with such a response is up for speculation, but at least fans now know some of what went into those verbose and interesting subtitles.


In the subtitle this new anthology is described as "from the foundation of the English spirit to the outstanding poetry of our own time, with lives of the poets and historical settings selected and integrated." Naturally an anthology of this kind should be general, should be objective and judicial, even if the poetry he has to include does not temperamentally appeal to the compiler. Louis Untermeyer's anthology seems to the present reviewer to be too personal-minded. It opens with the "Song of Songs" and continues for fifty-nine pages, about a twentieth of the space in the anthology, with other selections from books of the Bible, including items like the Lord's Prayer, Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthiana, pieces from the Sermon on the Mount, and passages from the Gospels. Now a large part of the Bible, as everybody knows, is great poetry, the most universal of all poetry, but it didn't come out of the English or any other European spirit. The first section of Louis Untermeyer's anthology belongs to the great Hebrew literature; there is no more point in including it in a volume of English poetry because of the wonderful translation than there would be for a German anthology claiming it for German literature on account of Luther's wonderful translation. As a sample of how nobly the English have translated the Bible it might be proper to put some specimens in the Jacobean period where it historically belongs, but it is out of place to start the first section of an English anthology with it. 041b061a72


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